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The caper

The caper


Posted By on Mar 4, 2017

The caper, whose name comes from the Arabic ‘cabr’ or ‘cabir’ is from the Asiatic, subtropical area. If left to blossom, they are very beautiful flowers, elegant and fragile, exotic. The fruit is called ‘cucunci’ and looks like a gherkin. If you can see the plant in flower it means that the cultivation has been neglected. Every flower is a caper not picked. In the Eolian Islands there are two varieties: the ‘nocella’ and the...

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The story of his passion says that Bartholomew Apostle was martyred in Asia. Many years after his passion, during a new wave of persecution against Christians, the pagans saw the people praying at his tomb and, out of hate, took away his body, placed it in a lead sarcophagus and threw it into the sea saying: may you never have influence over our people again. But with the intervention of God’s Providence the lead sarcophagus, carried...

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Eolian cuisine

Eolian cuisine


Posted By on Mar 3, 2017

Eolian cuisine is inspired, changeable, variegated, full of unifying and contrasting moods at the same time, thanks to the incredible concentration of history, culture, and customs that have gradually followed one another. In every dish there is ancient wisdom which the Eolian islanders have managed to enrich, elaborate and transform, until they make it an original and unrepeatable gastronomic experience. The principal characteristic...

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Around 1880 the Eolian islands, experienced a moment of great economic and demographic development. Agriculture and fishing traditionally occupied a large part of the workforce, although the merchant fleets of Lipari, Salina and Stromboli numbered more than 200 ships, with ‘Paranzieddi’, ‘Bovi’, ‘Marticane’ and ‘Briantini’ providing connections with Naples, Livorno, Marseilles and Toulon. It was the success of malmsey which towed...

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The architecture of the islands, excluding the many archaeological finds, the churches, the castle complex and the characteristic town houses, is made up mainly of rural buildings, designed for agricultural activity, which was once the primary economic activity of the islands. Very few examples still exist of buildings designed for uses other than dwelling, such as sheds for working or storing pumice stone, some mills, a former...

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